International Criminal Tribunals and Victims Of Crime
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International Criminal Tribunals and Victims Of Crime a study of the status of victims before International criminal tribunals and of factors affecting this status by Mikaela Heikkila

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Published by Institute Of Human Rights, Abo Akademi UniversityI in Finland .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMikaela Hiekkila.
The Physical Object
Pagination241p. ;
Number of Pages241
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22137302M
ISBN 109521214120

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  The international tribunals formed in response to crimes in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia have failed to effectively deter war crimes and punish perpetrators, said Washington and Lee law professor Mark Drumbl during a talk at the Law School Nov. 1. Drumbl recently penned a book on the subject, "Atrocity, Punishment, and International Law," which aims to . The proper construction of co-perpetration responsibility in international criminal law has become one of the most enduring controversies in this field, with the UN Tribunals endorsing the theory of joint criminal enterprise, and the International Criminal Court adopting the alternative joint control over the crime theory to define this mode of liability. International Criminal Law in Context provides a critical and contextual introduction to the fundamentals of international criminal law. It goes beyond a doctrinal analysis focused on the practice of international tribunals to draw on a variety of perspectives, capturing the complex processes of internationalisation that criminal law has experienced over the past few : Philipp Kastner. Structured in four parts, the book first sets out the key international law principles which assume special significance in relation to international criminal law before going on to consider international criminal tribunals, the prosecution of international crimes, and the 'core' international crimes which have been prosecuted to by: 5.

Alongside existing regimes for victim redress at the national and international levels, in the coming years international criminal law and, in particular, the International Criminal Court, will potentially provide a significant legal framework through which the .   In line with the International Law Commission’s view, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) 37 and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), 38 lack jurisdiction to deal with compensation for victims. Both the ICTY and ICTR Statutes and Rules provide for the restitution of property or the proceeds Cited by: Book Description. International Criminal Law in Context provides a critical and contextual introduction to the fundamentals of international criminal law. It goes beyond a doctrinal analysis focused on the practice of international tribunals to draw on a variety of perspectives, capturing the complex processes of internationalisation that criminal law has experienced over the past . d War crime: Intentionally attacking schools 80 e War crime: Attacks on humanitarian staff and objects81 Child victims and witnesses before the ICC 83 a Specific provisions relating to victims and witnesses83 b Special measures for child victims and witnesses84 c The Victims and Witnesses Unit and its functions

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: lxii, pages ; 25 cm: Contents: Fundamentals of international criminal law --The subjective and objective elements of international crimes --Modes of liability and criminal participation --The law of command responsibility --Defences in international criminal law --Immunities from criminal jurisdiction - . International Criminal Law Douglas Guilfoyle. Written by an outstanding scholar and teacher, this book provides the only student-focused guide to international criminal law; With teaching and learning at its heart, this text adopts a user-friendly writing style and follows a structure aligned with international criminal law courses. NARRATOR: Robert Cryer is professor of international criminal law at the University of Birmingham and co-author of the book, An Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure. He was at the forum in Rome, where countries finally signed a treaty agreeing to set up a permanent international criminal court.   Therefore, other institutions are also competent to prosecute war crimes: international, mixed and hybrid tribunals, and the International Criminal Court. In accordance with the Geneva conventions, war crimes must also be prosecuted in countries other than those where the crimes were committed, on the basis of universal jurisdiction.